7 Comments

We owns a duty to our fathers and the unborn to preserve the bloodline through Arete by using both tradition and innovation. It’s a fact that something will destroy Earth one day and we must settle the stars to preserve the fire and blood. To be both Apollonian in temperance and Dionysian in renewing our barbarian instinct.

Expand full comment

You mentioned that our fixation on the idea that we are Faustian might be obscuring our true origins. Are the true origins you refer to earlier in the discussion about the dialectic between Odinic and Tyrhic tendencies, or is there another perspective you’re alluding to?

Expand full comment
author

I was referring more to colonial peoples as mythologizing their reasons for leaving. Instead of puritans leaving England for America as oppressed religious minorities, it would be better to see them as frustrated aspirants to elite status.

Expand full comment

Understood. Thank you for the clarification sir

Expand full comment
May 3·edited May 3

Further taking liberty with analysis of Faust, while it is his restlessness which drove him, what enables his actions and his ultimate enslavement is a pact with demonic forces. We could pin the tail of these demonic forces on a number of things, but I agree that we are not Faust, and don't share his fate. We strive, but not at the cost of our soul.

Expand full comment

Not to split hairs but does Faust not get saved at the end of part 2?

On another point are you convinced that the transhumanist idea is Faustian? I'm sure the examples given were used in hyperbole but Harris and Jenner seem to crave these ideas from a deep sense of insecurity and dis-satisfaction with there own being; this in turn drives them to their conclusions in order to flatter their vanity and engage in a narcissistic self-aggrandisement (possibly I am armchair psychologising but I have read Harris and he has this striving sense about him which feels very insecure, Jenner I think requires further justification.) Faust on the other hand, and I think this becomes clearer in pt 2, uses his far seeing drive as a tool for ordering the world in a way that is actually effective (saves the kingdom and emperor from both fiscal and physical destruction), as well as satisfying his own drives. I interpret this in a Jungian sense, with Mephistopheles as the shadow that is integrated to the benefit of the empire. On the other hand transhumanism seems to be fundamentally about individual self-fufilment as individual self-fufilment, detached from any pre-ceding racial (or other?) categories. This is as opposed to the Faustian drive which is the representation of a uniquely western (taking Spengler at his word) way of being. Put another way I would argue that the Faustian spirit can only be applied to the European people's, but the transhumanist can and must be applied to all. Thus I'm hesitant to accept the classification of transhumanism as Faustian, albeit I acknowledge there are distinct parallels.

Nonetheless I continue to enjoy your exploration and application of the odinic/odyssesian dialect. I had not encountered it prior to reading your work, and am intrigued by it's psychological applications as much as its historical.

Expand full comment
author

Goethe makes Faust into a sort of comedy (in that he gets saved), but the traditional Faust folklore has him damned for eternity. This is more authentic, more in keeping with the spirit of the tale. Faust's drive to order the world is very Promethean; the two are comparable in the lesson at the heart of the story. I don't think we are the only Faustian people either. I would put the Jews down as more Faustian than us, and you can see the same restless spirit of conquest and rootless expansion in others too, such as the Mongols and Arabs.

Expand full comment